Wayne in Line for Top Honor
Justin Wayne
, an All-American pitcher at Stanford last year who now plays for the Montreal Expos, is a finalist for the 2000 Golden Spikes Award, which honors the top amateur baseball player in the United States. Wayne, '01, is the first Stanford finalist since Oakland A's catcher A.J. Hinch, '97, in 1996. No Cardinal player has yet won the award, which was scheduled to be presented on November 3 by USA Baseball, in coordination with the Major League Baseball Players Association.

Golfers Highly Regarded
Cardinal women's golf ranked second in the nation this fall in the MasterCard Collegiate Golf Rankings. At the same time, Golf World ranked the Cardinal women third, after Duke and defending NCAA champion Arizona.

Going, Going, Gone
Last year, the athletics department ventured into cyber-auctions to help raise money for its programs. The highest bid was $750 from four fans who wanted to watch a football game from a sofa on the 50-yard line. This season's auction packages were available for football and for men's and women's basketball. They included opportunities to watch a football practice, act as stadium announcer for a game, enjoy a catered dinner in the press box and serve as honorary captain at Big Game.

Media Likes Cardinal's Chances
The women's basketball team, which began the season with eight letter-winners and four starters, in October was chosen by Pac-10 women's basketball coaches as the team to beat in 2000-01. The Cardinal had a 21-9 overall record last year and advanced to the second round of the NCAA tournament, finishing second in a tight race. It was the first time Stanford was tabbed by coaches as the preseason favorite since the poll was launched in 1998-98. The Cardinal was last picked to win the Pac-10 race by the media in 1997-98.

Time for a Tournament?
Athletic directors of the Pac-10 have recommended that the conference conduct postseason tournaments in men's and women's basketball, beginning with the 2001-02 season. The Pac-10 is the only Division I conference besides the Ivy League that does not have a postseason basketball tournament. The proposal is awaiting ratification by eight of the 10 university presidents. Stanford athletic director Ted Leland, PhD '83, has opposed the postseason tournament, arguing that student-athletes would have to spend too much time on the road.