Campus surveys conducted in 1961, 1976 and 2003 posed some of the same questions. Comparisons may be risky, given variations in response rates, questionnaire formats and survey populations, but the results do challenge some assumptions about trends in student attitudes and behavior.

Observed cheating during an exam more than once
1961: 11 percent
1976: 41 percent
2003: 20 percent

Rate themselves somewhat informed or well-informed about Honor Code
1976: 65 percent
2003: 97.8 percent

Would report others cheating
1961: 26 percent
1976: 8 percent
2003: 35 percent

Copied a few sentences without footnoting
1961: 35 percent
1976: 35 percent
2003: 12.2 percent from print source; 16 percent from Internet

Worked with others on assignments when not permitted
1961: 16 percent
1976: 12 percent
2003: 12 percent

Copied from another during an exam
1961: 16 percent
1976: 14 percent
2003: 5.4 percent

Got answers from someone who took same exam
1961: 8 percent
1976: 13 percent
2003: 1.4 percent

Never turned in a paper done entirely or in part by another student
1961: 92 percent
1976: 96 percent
2003: 98.3 percent

Agree that under no circumstances is cheating justified
1961: 93 percent
1976: 63 percent
2003: 85 percent

Agree that students are morally obligated not to cheat
1961: 95 percent
1976: 75 percent
2003: 92 percent

Agree that cheating directly contradicts the goals of education
1961: 88 percent
1976: 74 percent
2003: 88.7 percent

Agree that cheating poses a moderate or serious threat at Stanford
1976: 43 percent
2003: 64.9 percent

Satisfied with educational experience at Stanford
1961: 93 percent
1976: 87 percent
2003: 97.8 percent